Pierce the ear and stab the spleen

  • Thomas Matteazzi Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Italo Balzani Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Michele Alberghini Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Federica Beretta Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Claudia Bon Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Davide Dotto Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Martina Frigo Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Olga Ilinciuc Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Flavia Lanzuisi Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Sara Angela Malerba Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Mauro Stragliotto Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Dorian Vataj Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.
  • Elena Campello | elena.campello@aopd.veneto.it Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedale Università, Sant’Antonio Hospital, Padua, Italy.

Abstract

Splenic abscess is a rare but extremely dangerous condition generally spreading from a local, or systemic, focus of infection. We present the case of a young immunocompetent female admitted with sepsis and multiple splenic abscesses. The patient had a recent left ear piercing on the tragus complicated by an ear infection. The presence of a solitary parotid abscess, the absence of other infectious foci on computed tomography scan, the negativity of blood cultures and the absence of endocarditis vegetations led us to think that the most likely culprit was a hematogenous dissemination from the left tragus. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics. There had been no need of splenectomy or any other procedure. This rather unique case underscores that splenic abscess should be suspected when a long-lasting fever and pain in the left hypochondrium are present, even when an apparently innocuous invasive procedure, such as a body piercing, is performed.

Dimensions

Altmetric

PlumX Metrics

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2020-06-17
Info
Issue
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
Antibiotics, cervical lymphadenopathy, infection sepsis, spleen abscess.
Statistics
  • Abstract views: 33

  • PDF: 29
  • HTML: 0
How to Cite
Matteazzi, T., Balzani, I., Alberghini, M., Beretta, F., Bon, C., Dotto, D., Frigo, M., Ilinciuc, O., Lanzuisi, F., Malerba, S. A., Stragliotto, M., Vataj, D., & Campello, E. (2020). Pierce the ear and stab the spleen. Italian Journal of Medicine, 14(2), 95-99. https://doi.org/10.4081/itjm.2020.1263